Special Issues

Call for Proposals for 2022 and 2023 Special Issues

The Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice invites proposals for special issues on contemporary themes associated with effective and innovative teaching and learning practice in the higher education environment. The expectation is that the special issue would be of interest to an international audience. To propose a special issue for 2022 or 2023 please complete the Special Issue Proposal and return to Dr Alisa Percy by email Alisa.Percy@uts.edu.au. The Journal periodically has specific calls for Special Issues, but also accepts unsolicited proposals.

Collaborative expressions of interest

At the Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, we understand the role that we can have in supporting early career researchers and academics to launch their international networks in the absence of international conferences. The Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice would like to support this transition during COVID-19. For academics seeking to form new international research relationships, please fill in the expression of interest form. We will aim to pair you with potential collaborators. At this stage, we can only pair English projects. Please note our support in forming collaborative teams does not guarantee publication in our Journal, and all final submissions will undergo rigorous peer review processes.

Current Calls for Papers

The following are Special Issues open for submissions, with a link to take you to the specific Call for Papers

Forthcoming Special Issues

The following are Special Issues closed for submissions that are preparing for future publication

SPECIAL ISSUE 2022 Skills, attributes, literacies, and capabilities: Developing our students at every level

Guest Editors

Background

The debate around the development of students’ skills and literacies is not a new one (Barrett-Lennard et al., 2012; Boyle et al., 2019; Hill, 2010; Lea & Street, 1998; Lonka & Ahola, 1995). Recently, however, the discussion across higher education has returned a focus onto the ways in which we can and do develop our students’ skills, attributes, capabilities and literacies (see, for example, the recent WonkHE publications around student skills development in the United Kingdom: (McVitty & Andrews, 2021).

This Special Issue aims to engage with the concept of ‘graduateness’ and ‘postgraduateness’ across higher education. This will range from papers on pre-entry, transition-in and undergraduate student skill enhancement to researcher development. The challenge to contributing authors and readers will be to conceptualise the development of their students’ capabilities and capacities in the broadest and most practical senses. This Special Issue will look for papers that highlight, discover, and illuminate research, theory, and practice that enhances our students’ literacies. In addition, strategy and policy papers that focus on the implementation of curricula, approaches, and institutional responses will be sought. Lastly, the issue will look for concrete examples of practice in the development of students’ literacies and skills within specific subjects and areas of work.

The global response of higher education to the COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically impacted the rate of change in teaching practice within institutions, but often without time, distance and space for critical reflection. At the same time, the emergency situation expanded the ways in which universities engage with, support and develop their students. This Special Issue will bring the debate of the enhancement of our students’ ‘graduateness’ into the perspective of the contemporary post-pandemic higher education institution; it will, though a process of considered analysis and evaluation of practices, provide a space to consider what has worked, what has not worked, and what would benefit us to take forward (Crawford, 2021). Have we reconsidered how we equip our students to engage in a modern world? In what ways, and through what methods, do we challenge our students to develop knowledge and abilities beyond just their subject material? What are the institutional- and sector-wide responses to the challenges facing our student bodies?

Moving beyond the initial emergency remote teaching responses to the recent pandemic, those within the sector are beginning to reassess their approach to student needs, and how those needs have changed. The employability market demands that students are able to articulate “not only a well-honed and evidenced skills set, but a sufficient critical reflexivity to match their aspirations to their strengths and capabilities” (McVitty, 2021). The changes to higher education – increased degree structure flexibility, micro-credentials, internationalisation, widening participation, increased student numbers, MOOCS – have often resulted in institutions that struggle to meet their existing and emerging commitments (Chyr et al., 2017; Goldstein, 2017; Gómez-Rey et al., 2016; Hancock, 2021; Holbrook et al., 2020; Lynch, 2018; Naidoo, 2007; Yowler et al., 2021).

With increased competition in the higher education sector, and with students demanding transparency in what their degrees offer them beyond subject knowledge, the discussion around skills development is rising to contemporary prominence. This Special Issue will lead this discussion through the combination of reflection on practice, discussion of current research and engagement with policy and strategy. Some possible topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • Peer learning, peer support, staff-student partnerships, and student-led activities
  • Learner development, researcher development (e.g. engaging with students’ academic and researcher skills for the twenty-first century)
  • University strategies and responses to twenty-first century student needs
  • The concept of the ‘value added’ by universities to our students (e.g. skills, attributes, ‘graduateness’, preparedness for careers) and the role of higher education within society
  • Reflection on/analysis of pedagogical change and innovation for the future (e.g. what works and what does not work for the post-pandemic world?)

Types of publications accepted into this Special Issue

The types of publications that are eligible for acceptance into this Special Issue include:

  • Theoretical and research papers (5000 – 7000 words)
  • Case studies and good practice examples (4000 – 6000 words)
  • Policy papers (2000 – 4000 words); internationally relevant comparative policy papers may be between 4000 – 8000 words

Developing a high-quality proposal

We recommend the creation of a single document (Word document preferably) that contains the following:

  • Proposed article title
  • Proposed authors names and affiliations
  • A clear evidence-based rationale for the line of inquiry proposed
  • Research question(s)
  • Proposed method (for both theoretical and empirical manuscripts)
  • Practice-based implications of the proposed research

The word limit for the proposal is 250 words (not including references) and is designed to give the Editorial Team a sense of the rigour of the manuscript proposed and the possible implications of such research. The Editorial Team may return with an invitation to combine similar manuscripts. Acceptance of proposals does not guarantee acceptance of final manuscripts.

Timeline

  • Proposals due: 12 July 2021
  • Acceptance notifications: 23 July 2021
  • Full articles due: 5 January 2022
  • Final revised papers due: 25 April 2022
  • Final publication: 29 August 2022

For further information, or to submit an abstract, please email: leads-JUTLPSpecIss2022@glasgow.ac.uk. You can download a .pdf version of the Call for Expressions of Interest by clicking here

References

  • Barrett-Lennard, S., Chalmers, D., & Longnecker, N. (2012). Embedding communication skills across the curriculum: Helping students into their degrees and out into the workplace. 1–5.
  • Boyle, J., Ramsay, S., & Struan, A. (2019). The Academic Writing Skills Programme: A model for technology-enhanced, blended delivery of an academic writing programme. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 16(4), 1–12. https://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol16/iss4/4
  • Chyr, W., Shen, P., Chiang, Y., Lin, J., & Tsai, C. (2017). Exploring the Effects of Online Academic Help-Seeking and Flipped Learning on Improving Students’ Learning. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 20(3), 11–23. https://www.jstor.org/stable/26196116
  • Crawford, J. (2021). During and beyond a pandemic: Publishing learning and teaching research through COVID-19. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 18(3). https://ro.uow.edu.au/jutlp/vol18/iss3/02
  • Goldstein, D. (2017, August 2). Why Kids Can’t Write. The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/02/education/edlife/writing-education-grammar-students-children.html
  • Gómez-Rey, P., Barbera, E., & Fernández-Navarro, F. (2016). The Impact of Cultural Dimensions on Online Learning. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 19(4), 225–238. https://www.jstor.org/stable/jeductechsoci.19.4.225
  • Hancock, S. (2021). What is known about doctoral employment? Reflections from a UK study and directions for future research. Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 0(0), 1–17. https://doi.org/10.1080/1360080X.2020.1870027
  • Hill, P. (2010). From Deficiency to Development: The evolution of academic skills provision at one UK university. Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education, 2, 1–19. https://doi.org/10.47408/jldhe.v0i2.54
  • Holbrook, A., Burke, R., & Fairbairn, H. (2020). Linguistic diversity and doctoral assessment: Exploring examiner treatment of candidate language. Higher Education Research & Development, 0(0), 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1080/07294360.2020.1842336
  • Lea, M. R., & Street, B. V. (1998). Student writing in higher education: An academic literacies approach. Studies in Higher Education, 23(2), 157–172. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079812331380364
  • Lonka, K., & Ahola, K. (1995). Activating instruction: How to foster study and thinking skills in higher education. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 10(4), 351–368. https://www.jstor.org/stable/23420021
  • Lynch, M. (2018, January 27). Why Can’t Most College Graduates Write a Decent Essay? The Edvocate. https://www.theedadvocate.org/cant-college-graduates-write-decent-essay/
  • McVitty, D. (2021). From work-ready to world-ready—Why breaking down knowledge silos is the next frontier in student development. WonkHE. https://wonkhe.com/blogs/from-work-ready-to-world-ready-why-breaking-down-knowledge-silos-is-the-next-frontier-in-student-development/
  • McVitty, D., & Andrews, M. (2021). Skills to Thrive—Academics’ perceptions of student skills development. WonkHE. http://wonkhe.com/blogs/skills-to-thrive-academics-perceptions-of-student-skills-development/
  • Naidoo, V. (2007). Research on the flow of international students to UK universities: Determinants and implications. Journal of Research in International Education, 6(3), 287–307. https://doi.org/10.1177/1475240907083197
  • Yowler, J., Knier, K., WareJoncas, Z., [...] & Pierret, C. (2021). Rapid adaptation and remote delivery of undergraduate research training during the COVID 19 Pandemic | bioRxiv. https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.02.24.432694v1.full

SPECIAL ISSUE 2022 Pedagogies of belonging in an anxious world

Guest Editors

Background

In this special issue on pedagogies of belonging, we invite authors to engage with the ways we design learning experiences and curricula that enable students to thrive in a super complex, uncertain and increasingly anxious world (Barnett, 2012, 2015). Recognising that the world pre- and post-Covid is one that is characterised by somatic, environmental, geospatial, psycho-social, socio-political and epistemological pandemics, we advocate for a deeper engagement with what it means to belong – to our communities, to each other, to our professions, to our studies and institutions (Loftus, 2010), and most importantly, to our own becoming – and to attend to what this means for our role as educators in the higher education environment.

The aim of this Special Issue is to enable critical examination, elicit important insights, and together, develop a more nuanced understanding of belonging in the higher education context. We recognise there are many ways to frame and approach the concept of belonging in the educational experience. No matter which school of thought we locate ourselves in (e.g., psychological, socio-cultural, feminist, spatial/human geography, design/architectural), belonging can be recognised as a fundamental human need and a salient driver for learning and self-actualisation. So, what is the role of belonging in our curricula and pedagogies? How do we enact it on an everyday level, such that identities are formed, foregrounded by the essential aspect of learning ways of knowing, doing, and acting, and being and becoming (Dall’Alba, 2009).

Why engage in the idea of belonging?
The idea of belonging has found salience in the post-COVID-19 learning environment. In times of disruption, alienation and isolation, the most basic of our psychological and physiological needs have come to be almost universally recognised as critical factors that must be addressed within higher education. At the same time, we also recognise that there are multiple understandings of what belonging means and, therefore, how it is enacted and experienced within the curricula and the “classroom” in all its various forms (e.g., Arasaratnam-Smith et al., 2021; Larsen et al., 2021). We invite that plurality as productive in thinking through all the frames that might be brought to bear on the concept of belonging.

In an age of super complexity and unpredictability, belonging engenders a complicated and multifaceted process of being and becoming differently as we engage with an unknown future. Given the increasing state of complexity and uncertainty in today’s society, learning for an unknown future therefore demands an ontological turn (Benner, 2015; Dall’Alba, 2009; Green, 2010). As Barnett (2015) observed, “it implies an education in which a sense of an unknown future is evidently present, or at least serves as a major organizing principle in the design of the curriculum and in the enacting of pedagogy” (p. 220). It can be discerned, then, that the challenges and ambiguities of becoming in this space warrant a critical discourse of curricular and pedagogical importance. This special issue aims to engage in such a discourse.

Ways to participate and contribute
In this Special Issue, we invite papers that take a critical perspective to their own intellectual standpoint in relation to pedagogies of belonging, to situate themselves both theoretically and practically, and advance our understanding of practices that promote student belonging in all its possible forms within the higher education experience.

We suggest that the possibilities for belonging offered by interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches and strategies are promising and ripe for inquiry, and the place of non-traditional, Indigenous, iterative and emergent methodologies to examine belonging requires further exploration. Questions to advance theory and practice of belonging include:

  • What theoretical foundations are brought to bear on concepts of belonging and how does this translate into practice across disciplinary fields?
  • How do we make sense of belonging in the higher education setting?
  • How does belonging feature in a pedagogy for an anxious world?
  • Whose belonging matters in higher education in a world of super complexity?
  • From whose perspective do we conceptualise and enact belonging in an era of pandemic crisis?

The issue will survey a range of themes and sub-themes and will solicit and address conceptual papers, papers with an educational practice or pedagogical thrust and those which involve empirical research. Some possible topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • Belonging as a response to super complexity
  • Pedagogies for developing individual and collective agency
  • Indigenous ways of belonging
  • Communities in hybrid and blended pedagogical models
  • Participatory and inclusive pedagogy in online (and other) communities and organisations
  • Belongingness across the landscape of practice
  • Assessment strategies that promote belonging e.g. e-portfolios, authentic assessments, collaborative and peer assessment, reflective assessment tasks, invigilated examinations
  • Types of publications accepted into this Special Issue

    The types of publications that are eligible for acceptance into this Special Issue include:

    • Theoretical and research papers (5000 – 7000 words)

    Developing a high-quality proposal

    We have developed a proposal proforma online to guide your submission. The proforma contains the following required elements:

    • Contact email
    • Title
    • Author/s names and affiliations
    • Abstract (no longer than 250 words)
    • References
    • Type of paper proposed
    • How the proposal relates to the themes of the Special Issue
    • Proposed structure

    To submit a proposal, please use this form

    The Editorial Team may return with an invitation to combine similar manuscripts. Acceptance of proposals does not guarantee acceptance of final manuscripts.

    Timeline

    • Proposals due: 6 August 2021
    • Acceptance notifications: 20 August 2021
    • Full articles due: 4 January 2022
    • Final revised papers due: 15 April 2022
    • Final publication: 15 July 2022

    For further information, please email: Dr Nona Press. You can download a Word version of the Call for Expressions of Interest by clicking here

    References

    • Arasaratnam-Smith, L., Coetzee, N., & Hodson, C. (2021). The double-edged sword of ‘best aspects’ and ‘needs improvement’ in student experiences: A qualitative analysis. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 18(3), 06.
    • Barnett, R. (2012). Learning for an unknown future. Higher Education Research & Development, 31, 65-77. doi:10.1080/07294360.2012.642841
    • Barnett, R. (2015). Thinking and rethinking the university in the selected works of Ronald Barnett. Milton Park, UK: Routledge.
    • Benner, P. (2015). Curricular and pedagogical implications for the Carnegie study, educating nurses: A call for radical transformation. Asian Nursing Research, 9(1), 1-6.
    • Dall’Alba, G. (2009). Learning professional ways of being: Ambiguities of becoming. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 41, 34-45.
    • Green, B. (2010). Knowledge, the future, and education (al) research: A new-millennial challenge. The Australian Educational Researcher, 37, 43-62.
    • Larsen, A., Cox, S., Bridge, C., Horvath, D., Emmerling, M., & Abrahams, C. (2021). Short, multi-modal, pre-commencement transition programs for a diverse STEM cohort. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 18(3), 05.
    • Loftus, S. (2010). Exploring communities of practice: Landscapes, boundaries and identities. In J. Higgs, I. Goulter, S. Loftus, J. Reid, & F. Trede (Eds.), Education for Future Practice (pp. 3-14). Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense Publishers.

    SPECIAL ISSUE 2022 Women and Leadership in Higher Education Learning and Teaching

    Guest Editors

    Background

    There is a changing landscape of academic leadership that have a much greater emphasis on flexibility, agility, innovation, and team-based structures. More broadly, leadership in higher education is moving towards models that focus on building capacity, as well as shared and distributed leadership. However, a recent review of the literature indicates there is a gender disparity in the academic leadership environment (Allen et al., 2021). For example, only 28% of vice chancellors in Australia are women (Butler-Henderson, Percy and Kelder, 2021). Further, there is a trend for women to occupy leadership roles related to teaching and learning or engagement, compared to research and development or administration, or to engage in internal leadership roles compared to men, who are more likely to engage in industry engagement leadership roles (Allen et al., 2021). The proportion of women awarded nationally competitive research funding is also disproportionate (ARC, 2020; Oliveria et al., 2019), which leads to fewer scholarly outputs (such as journal articles or conference presentations). Further, the intersection between gender and race, culture, religion, and/or age present further barriers for women to leadership opportunities and success (Abalkhail, 2017; Bagguley & Hussain, 2014; Davis & Maldonado, 2015). This special issue will examine the leadership challenges and opportunities for women in higher education learning and teaching.

    Some possible topics relevant to learning and teaching could include, but are not limited to:

    • Leadership challenges and opportunities for women
    • Supervision and mentorship
    • Strategies to advance leadership career progression
    • Strategic institutional responses to address imbalance
    • Sustaining research leadership for women
    • Personal qualities in women for leadership roles
    • Intersectionality and leadership

    Types of publications accepted into this Special Issue

    The types of publications that are eligible for acceptance into this Special Issue include:

    • Theoretical and research papers
    • Review articles
    • Case studies
    • Commentary

    Developing a high-quality proposal

    We recommend the creation of a single document (Word document preferably) that contains the following:

    • Proposed article title
    • Proposed authors names and affiliations
    • A clear evidence-based rationale for the line of inquiry proposed
    • Research question(s)
    • Proposed method (for both theoretical and empirical manuscripts)
    • Practice-based implications of the proposed research

    The word limit for the proposal is 250 words (not including references) and is designed to give the Editorial Team a sense of the rigour of the manuscript proposed and the possible implications of such research. The Editorial Team may return with an invitation to combine similar manuscripts. Acceptance of proposals does not guarantee acceptance of final manuscripts.

    Timeline

    • Proposals due: 23 July 2021
    • Acceptance notifications: 6 August 2021
    • Full articles due: 30 November 2021
    • Final revised papers due: 1 February 2022
    • Final publication: 8 March 2022 (International Women's Day)

    For further information, or to submit an abstract, please email: Prof Angela Carbone or Prof Kerryn Butler-Henderson. You can download a .pdf version of the Call for Expressions of Interest by clicking here

    References

    • Abalkhail, J.M. (2017). Women and leadership: challenges and opportunities in Saudi higher education. Career Development International, 22(2), 165-183. https://doi.org/10.1108/CDI-03-2016-0029.
    • Allen K-A, Butler-Henderson K, Reupert A, Longmuir F, Finefter-Rosenbluh I, Berger E, Grove C, Heffernan A, Freeman N, Kewalramani S, Krebs S, Dsouza L, Mackie G, Chapman D, Fleer M. 2021. Work like a girl: Redressing gender inequity in academia through systemic solutions. Journal of University Teaching and Learning practice. 18(3): https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2416&context=jutlp
    • Australian Research Council [ARC]. (2020, December 23). Selection Outcome Reports. ARC. https://www.arc.gov.au/grants/grant-outcomes/selection-outcome-reports
    • Bagguley, P., & Hussain, Y. (2014). Negotiating mobility: South Asian Women and higher education. Sociology, 50(1), 43-59. https://doi.org/10.1177/0038038514554329.
    • Butler-Henderson K., Percy A., Kelder J-A. 2021. Editorial 18:3 Celebrating women in higher education on International Women’s Day. Journal of University Teaching and Learning practice. 18(3): 1-2.
    • Davis, D.R. & Maldonado, C. (2015). Shattering the glass ceiling: the leadership development of African American women in higher education. Advancing Women in Leadership, 35, 48-64. https://doi.org/10.18738/awl.v35i0.125
    • Oliveria, D., F., Ma, Y., & Woodruff, T., K. (2019). Comparison of National Institutes of Health Grant Amounts to First-Time Male and Female Principal Investigators. JAMA, 391(9), 898-900. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2018.21944

    SPECIAL ISSUE 2022 Innovation in Higher Education Assessment: Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Guest Editors

    Background

    COVID-19 has made significant and, to a great extent, irreversible changes to how curriculum is designed and delivered. There is a plethora of articles and special issues devoted to the impacts of COVID-19 (Crawford et al., 2020; Pokhrel & Chhetri, 2021) on teaching and learning in a university context. Indeed, while online and more flexible teaching practices were already gradually increasing globally before the pandemic began, the crisis prompted immediate innovation in the ways learning happened at university. As a result, it is unlikely that any higher education research can be conducted without acknowledging the pandemic as a significant contextual factor in teaching and learning practice from 2020 onwards (Crawford, 2021). Some studies, for instance, suggested COVID-19 was a ‘there is no alternative’ moment, meaning that there could never be a full return to normal assessment practice once the pandemic subsided (Fuller et al., 2020).

    The crisis necessarily prompted new forms of assessment because traditional types—such as on-campus exams—were no longer possible due to mandatory government social distancing requirements. Most notably, assessments conducted in online environments increased exponentially in a range of different formats (García-Peñalvo et al., 2020; Guimarães & Lima, 2021). While much has been published already about what happened in higher education assessment during 2020, there is still a need for further literature that explores and reflects upon the broader trends, impact, and rigour of new forms of assessment brought about originally by COVID-19.

    Before the pandemic, there was innovation in assessment (see Boud & Falchikov, 2007; Knight, 2002; York, 2003). COVID-19, not withstanding the challenges faced, provides a unique opportunity to innovate in online assessment, and assessment in a post-pandemic world. This Special Issue actively encourages bold thinking and evidence-based practice of new and creative approaches to using assessment as a practice as, for, and of learning. The focus of this Special Issue is the longer-term impact on higher education assessment due to COVID-19. It moves beyond an analysis of alternative assessments and practices during 2020 and considers the broader seismic shifts in how students are assessed at university and how this may develop over time. More specifically, in the COVID-19 context, we are interested in papers that include topics such as:

    Some possible topics relevant to learning and teaching could include, but are not limited to:

    • Comparative empirical analyses of tertiary assessment before, during and after the pandemic
    • The relationship between employability and assessment in a post-pandemic world
    • Critical reflections on academic development in assessment design and moderation
    • Technology enhanced learning and assessment integrity in online environments
    • Student support for completing assessments
    • Innovative assessment design

    We are especially interested in global and interdisciplinary perspectives and encourage prospective authors to work collaboratively with colleagues in different contexts in preparing an abstract.

    Types of publications accepted into this Special Issue

    The types of publications that are eligible for acceptance into this Special Issue include:

    • We are seeking to publish 5,000 to 7,000 word research papers (empirical or theoretical)
    • Systematic reviews, critical reflections, and practice-based papers will also be accepted, but must be grounded in the scholarly literature and adopt a clear theoretical framework where appropriate. All submissions must also align with JUTLP’s author guidelines.

    Developing a high-quality proposal

    We recommend the creation of a single document (Word document preferably) that contains the following:

    • Proposed article title
    • Proposed authors names and affiliations
    • A clear evidence-based rationale for the line of inquiry proposed
    • Research question(s)
    • Proposed method (for both theoretical and empirical manuscripts)
    • Practice-based implications of the proposed research

    The word limit for the proposal is 250 words (not including references) and is designed to give the Editorial Team a sense of the rigour of the manuscript proposed and the possible implications of such research. The Editorial Team may return with an invitation to combine similar manuscripts. Acceptance of proposals does not guarantee acceptance of final manuscripts.

    Timeline

    • Proposals due: 1 November 2021
    • Acceptance notifications: 1 December 2021
    • Full articles due: 1 May 2022
    • Final revised papers due: 1 July 2022
    • Final publication: 1 August 2022

    For further information, or to submit an abstract, please email: Dr Andrew Kelly. You can download a .pdf version of the Call for Expressions of Interest by clicking here

    References

    • Boud, D., & Falchikov, N. (2007). Rethinking assessment in higher education: Learning for the longer term. United Kingdom: Routledge.
    • Crawford, J. (2021). During and beyond a pandemic: Publishing learning and teaching research through COVID-19. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 18(3), 02.
    • Crawford, J., Butler-Henderson, K., Rudolph, J., Malkawi, B., Burton, R., Magni, P., & Lam, S. (2020). COVID-19: 20 countries' higher education intra-period digital pedagogy responses. Journal of Applied Learning & Teaching 3(1), 1-20. 10.37074/jalt.2020.3.1.7
    • Fuller, R., Joynes, V., Cooper, J., Boursicot, K., & Roberts, T. (2020). Could COVID-19 be our ‘There is no alternative’(TINA) opportunity to enhance assessment? Medical Teacher, 42(7), 781-786.
    • García-Peñalvo, F., Corell, A., Abella-García, V., & Grande, M. (2020). Online assessment in higher education in the time of COVID-19. Education in the Knowledge Society, 21.
    • Guimarães, L., & Lima, R. (2021). Changes in teaching and learning practice in an undergraduate logistics and transportation course using problem-based learning. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 18(3), 012.
    • Knight, P. (2002). Summative assessment in higher education: practices in disarray. Studies in Higher Education, 27(3), 275-286.
    • Pokhrel, S., & Chhetri, R. (2021). A literature review on impact of COVID-19 pandemic on teaching and learning. Higher Education for the Future, 8(1), 133-141.
    • Yorke, M. (2003). Formative assessment in higher education: Moves towards theory and the enhancement of pedagogic practice. Higher Education, 45(4), 477-501.

    SPECIAL ISSUE 2021 The cross-cultural effects of COVID-19 on higher education learning and teaching practice

    This call for papers is now closed. However, the Journal will still consider full length articles for standard publication that align to this Special Issue.

    Timeline

    • Proposals due: 15 December 2020
    • Acceptance notifications: 20 December 2020
    • Full articles due: 1 May 2021
    • Final revised papers due: 1 July 2021
    • Final publication: 30 July 2021

    SPECIAL ISSUE 2021 Collaboration in higher education: Working in partnership with students, academic colleagues and others

    This call for papers is now closed. However, the Journal will still consider full length articles for standard publication that align to this Special Issue.

    Timeline

    • Call for papers open: 25 September 2020
    • Proposals due: 15 December 2020
    • Acceptance notifications: 15 January 2021
    • Full papers due: 1 June 2021
    • Final revised papers due: 1 October 2021
    • Target publication date: 30 November 2021