Special Issues

Call for Proposals for 2022 Special Issues

The Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice invites proposals for special issues on contemporary themes associated with effective and innovative teaching and learning practice in the higher education environment. The expectation is that the special issue would be of interest to an international audience. To propose a special issue for 2022 please complete the Special Issue Proposal and return to Dr Alisa Percy by email Alisa.Percy@uts.edu.au by February 26, 2021.

Collaborative expressions of interest

At the Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice, we understand the role that we can have in supporting early career researchers and academics to launch their international networks in the absence of international conferences. The Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice would like to support this transition during COVID-19. For academics seeking to form new international research relationships, please fill in the expression of interest form. We will aim to pair you with potential collaborators. At this stage, we can only pair English projects. Please note our support in forming collaborative teams does not guarantee publication in our Journal, and all final submissions will undergo rigorous peer review processes.

Current Calls for Papers

The following are Special Issues open for submissions, with a link to take you to the specific Call for Papers

Forthcoming Special Issues

The following are Special Issues closed for submissions that are preparing for future publication

  • Innovations and challenges in teaching of statistics to non-specialists (Part A), December 2020
  • Satisfying the many masters in higher education: Experience from law and engineering disciplines, January 2021
  • Innovations and challenges in teaching of statistics to non-specialists (Part B), November 2021

SPECIAL ISSUE 2021 The cross-cultural effects of COVID-19 on higher education learning and teaching practice

Guest Editors

Background

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has had significant impacts on higher education learning and teaching practices. The pandemic has required governments to create immediate responses to rapid growth in global cases of the virus. For universities and higher education institutions, the rapid process towards online learning has been critical for the continuation of learning and teaching agendas (Crawford et al., 2020a). One of the most common responses has been reactionary, by a sector largely unprepared for the new world order. These have included delays to the commencement of teaching delivery periods with the hope the lockdown periods would quickly end. It has also included responding to governmental minimum standards, such as limits on indoor gathering. The sector has been shaken, with significant discussions of assurance of learning, wellbeing, financial viability, and leadership emerging in the literature (e.g. Bao, 2020; Peters et al., 2020; Wong, 2020). Common manuscripts early during COVID-19 on higher education practice have commonly been associated with rapid digitalisation of learning activities and assessments. These, while providing opportunities to engage in collaborative learning on effective adaptions to learning and teaching during COVID-19 require greater global context and synthesis. We believe there is a genuine need for timely theoretical and empirical research that draws on perspectives of international collaborations for learning and teaching practice (Crawford et al., 2020b). Some possible topics could include, but are not limited to:

  • Cross-cultural differences in discipline-specific education (e.g. medical education)
  • Transnational transition activities (e.g. how country-level learning practices differs)
  • Specific pedagogies during COVID-19 (e.g. new digital pedagogies)
  • Effects of COVID-19 on student outcomes (e.g. success, wellbeing, engagement, employability, and learning)
  • Pedagogical innovations during COVID-19 (e.g. new assessments, instruction, and learning activities)
  • Practical impacts of COVID-19 on staff (e.g. job security, wellbeing)
  • Financial assessments of university practices

To promote a future of collaboration during the COVID-19 pandemic, no proposals that do not focus on cross-cultural and international comparisons will be accepted. There is a growing volume of single institution and/or single country-level studies, and these offer useful practice that may not be generalisable or transferable to the learning and teaching practices of others. For authors considering writing a proposal without international collaborators, we encourage accessing the collaborative expression of interest process below.

Developing a high-quality proposal

We recommend the creation of a single document (Word document preferably) that contains the following:

  • Proposed article title
  • Proposed authors names and affiliations
  • A clear evidence-based rationale for the line of inquiry proposed
  • Research question(s)
  • Proposed method (for both theoretical and empirical manuscripts)
  • Practice-based implications of the proposed research

The word limit for the proposal is 250 words (not including references) and is designed to give the Editorial Team a sense of the rigour of the manuscript proposed and the possible implications of such research. The Editorial Team may return with an invitation to combine similar manuscripts. Acceptance of proposals does not guarantee acceptance of final manuscripts. The Journal of University Teaching and Learning Practice has formed collaborative relationships with the Journal of Applied Learning and Teaching and Scope Work-Based Learning Journal, and may recommend quality manuscripts that are not accepted for inclusion in these journals; noting that these journals will accept the peer review reports from our Special Issue.

Timeline

  • Proposals due: 15 December 2020
  • Acceptance notifications: 20 December 2020
  • Full articles due: 1 May 2021
  • Final revised papers due: 1 July 2021
  • Final publication: 30 July 2021

This call for papers is now closed. However, the Journal will still consider full length articles for standard publication that align to this Special Issue.

References

  • Bao, W. (2020). COVID‐19 and online teaching in higher education: A case study of Peking University. Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies, 2(2), 113-115. doi 10.1002/hbe2.191
  • Crawford, J., Butler-Henderson, K., Rudolph, J., Malkawi, B., Glowatz, M., Burton, R., ... & Lam, S. (2020). COVID-19: 20 countries' higher education intra-period digital pedagogy responses. Journal of Applied Learning & Teaching, 3(1), 9-27. doi: 10.37074/jalt.2020.3.1.7.
  • Crawford, J., Percy, A., & Kelder, J. A. (2020). JUTLP Editorial 17.3: Connection, digital education, and student-centric teaching practice before COVID-19. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 17(3), 1.
  • Peters, M., Wang, H., Ogunniran, M., Huang, Y., Green, B., Chunga, J., ... & Khomera, S. (2020). China’s internationalized higher education during Covid-19: collective student autoethnography. Postdigital Science and Education, 1. Advanced Online Publication. doi: 10.1007/s42438-020-00128-1
  • Toquero, C. (2020). Challenges and opportunities for higher education amid the COVID-19 pandemic: The Philippine context. Pedagogical Research, 5(4), Advanced Online Publication. doi: 10.29333/pr/7947
  • Wang, C., Cheng, Z., Yue, X., & McAleer, M. (2020). Risk management of COVID-19 by universities in China. Journal of Risk Financial Management, 12(3), 36. Doi: 10.3390/jrfm13020036.
  • Wong, R. (2020). Medical education during COVID-19: Lessons from a pandemic. BC Medical Journal. Advanced Online Publication.

SPECIAL ISSUE 2021 Collaboration in higher education: Working in partnership with students, academic colleagues and others

Guest Editors

Background

This special issue focuses on the opportunities (and challenges) created by engaging in collaboration and partnership in higher education. As higher education institutions become ever more competitive to sustain their place in a global, neoliberal education market, students and staff are confronted with alienating practices. Such practices create an audit and surveillance culture that is exacerbated by the recent COVID-19 pandemic and the wholesale ‘pivot’ to online teaching. In this individualistic and competitive climate we are looking for papers that advocate a more inclusive and empowering education. One that sees learning and teaching as a practice that enables personal, collective and societal growth rather than a means to an end. The human element of education is therefore at the core of this special issue: focusing on what we can do and achieve together, both students and (academic) staff.

Why focus on collaborative practices?

Successful education depends on more than the banking of information (Freire, 2007). Rather than pander to reductive notions of ‘schooling’, ‘employability and ‘skills’ (Lea & Street, 1998; see also JLDHE, Special Issue, 15, 2019), we need curricula and practices that encourage a critical consciousness for social action. Whilst traditional schooling suppresses the (collaborative) imagination, what is called for in higher education are practices that unleash creative potential and open ‘an aperture on alternative ontologies that are more in tune with a politics of immanence’, that challenge epistemological essentialism and offer ‘the promise of radical transformation’ (Springer, 2016, p. 249).

The humane university requires methods and methodologies that offer multiple, non-hierarchical entry and exit points (Deleuze & Guattari, 1987), that embrace uncertainty (Cormier, 2012) and creativity (Barnett, 2004; Robinson, 2006; Sinfield et al., 2019). For it is in the collective ‘third space’ (Bhabha, 2004; Burns et al., 2019; Gutierrez, 2008) that, by ‘being with’ (Nancy, 2000), individuals start to ‘become’. Or, as Soja (1996, pp. 56-57) said, where:

everything comes together... subjectivity and objectivity, the abstract and the concrete, the real and the imagined, the knowable and the unimaginable, the repetitive and the differential, structure and agency, mind and body, consciousness and the unconscious, the disciplined and the transdisciplinary, everyday life and unending history.

With the ‘de-colonisation’ (Bali & Sharma, 2014; hooks, 1994; Quinn, 2019) of the curriculum, we urgently need praxes and habits that allow for collaboration and the formation of communities of practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991) that sustain, provoke, challenge, extend and support. A critical (Freire, 2007) and democratic (Dewey, 1916) pedagogy to create a humane university that acknowledges the super-complexity of people’s lives (Abegglen et al., 2020). In this issue we aim to explore what is possible when students and staff work in partnership to co-create their learning, their research, and/or the spaces and places they inhabit.

Contributions of desire

We are interested in theoretical and practical explorations of how students and staff can take control of where and how they work together; finding their academic identities in ways that are recognised by the academy, but which they negotiate more on their own terms, and in collaboration.

We want to showcase examples of a range of inspiring, creative collaborative practices (rather than “best practice”) and also open up the discussion of what it means to co-construct learning, teaching and a humane academia. Important here is that localised case studies speak to the international context and how they are informed by, and informing of, the international higher education landscape and literature. We want papers that explore the power of collaboration – and papers that are produced collaboratively.

Discipline areas include those active in the field of education in the broadest sense but particularly those that want to further and positively influence developments in learning and teaching, in pedagogy and practice - and those that engage in curriculum development in the widest sense.

Topics of interest

We want to showcase innovative approaches, fresh applications of theory and/or creative responses to policy that “reframe” ideas of partnership and collaboration in the university context. Emphasis is on collaborative endeavours that can improve the experience of students and staff. In particular, we are seeking contributions that creatively address the areas below (noting all proposals related to the special issue theme will be considered):

  • Staff and students working in partnership
  • “Re-framing” group projects and teamwork for co-learning
  • Collaborative educational research, joint writing and joint authorship
  • Co-creation of learning/learning spaces and ‘being with’ (staff with students, but also staff with staff including cross-disciplinary partnerships)
  • Collaborations with ‘other’ stakeholders
  • Partnership for social justice
  • Virtually connecting

The vision for this special edition seeds the development of an ecology of collaborative practice and advocates for joint learning and teaching approaches in higher education.

Developing a high-quality proposal

We recommend the creation of a single document (Word document preferably) that contains the following:

  • Proposed article title
  • Proposed authors names and affiliations
  • A clear evidence-based rationale for the line of inquiry proposed
  • Research question(s)
  • Proposed method (for both theoretical and empirical manuscripts)
  • Practice-based implications of the proposed research

The word limit for the proposal is 250 words (not including references) and is designed to give the Editorial Team a sense of the rigour of the manuscript proposed and the possible implications of such research. The Editorial Team may return with an invitation to combine similar manuscripts. Acceptance of proposals does not guarantee acceptance of final manuscripts.

Final papers should be between 5,000 – 7,000 words, including references, or approximately 15 pages with an upper limit of 20 pages. Papers should include:

  • A clear rationale and theoretical underpinnings
  • Context of work
  • Case study examples
  • Evaluation and impacts
  • Implications and recommendations

Timeline

  • Call for papers open: 25 September 2020
  • Proposals due: 15 December 2020
  • Acceptance notifications: 15 January 2021
  • Full papers due: 1 June 2021
  • Final revised papers due: 1 October 2021
  • Target publication date: 30 November 2021

This call for papers is now closed. However, the Journal will still consider full length articles for standard publication that align to this Special Issue.

References

  • Abegglen, S., Burns, T., Maier, S., & Sinfield, S. (2020). Supercomplexity: Acknowledging students’ lives in the 21st century university. Innovative Practice in Higher Education, 4(1), 20-38.
  • Bali, M., & Sharma, S. (2014, April 11). Bonds of difference: Participation as inclusion. Hybrid Pedagogy, https://hybridpedagogy.org/bonds-difference-participation-inclusion/ (accessed 23 September 2020).
  • Barnett, R. (2004). Learning for an unknown future. Higher Education Research & Development, 23(3), 247-260. https://doi.org/10.1080/0729436042000235382.
  • Bhabha, H. (2004). The location of culture. Abingdon: Routledge.
  • Burns, T., Sinfield, S., & Abegglen, S. (2019). Third space partnerships with students: Becoming educational together. International Journal for Students as Partners, 3(1), 60-68. https://doi.org/10.15173/ijsap.v3i1.3742.
  • Cormier, D. (2012). Embracing uncertainty: Rhizomatic learning. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=95&v=VJIWyiLyBpQ.
  • Deleuze, G. & Guattari, F. (1987). A thousand plateaus: Capitalism and schizophrenia. Minneapolis, London: University of Minnesota Press.
  • Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and education: An introduction to the philosophy of education. New York, NY: Macmillan.
  • Freire, P. (2007). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York, NY: Continuum.
  • Gutierrez, K. (2008). Developing a socio-critical literacy in the third space. Reading Research Quarterly, 43(2), 148-164. https://doi.org/10.1598/RRQ.43.2.3
  • hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Journal of Learning Development for Higher Education. (2019). Academic Literacies, Special Edition, no. 15, http://journal.aldinhe.ac.uk/index.php/jldhe/issue/view/29.
  • Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Lea, M., & Street, B. (1998). Student writing in higher education: An academic literacies approach. Studies in Higher Education, 23(2), 157-172. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079812331380364
  • Nancy, J. (2000). Being singular plural, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  • Robinson, K. (2006). Do schools kill creativity?. TED Talk, https://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_do_schools_kill_creativity?language=en.
  • Sinfield, S., Burns, T., & Abegglen, S. (2019). Exploration: Becoming playful - the power of a ludic module. In A James and C Nerantzi (Eds.), The power of play in higher education: Creativity in tertiary learning (pp. 23-31). London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Soja, E. (1996). Thirdspace. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing Inc.
  • Springer, S. (2016). Learning through the soles of our feet: unschooling, anarchism, and the geography of childhood. In S Springer, R White and M Souza de (Eds.), The radicalization of pedagogy: Anarchism, geography and the spirit of revolt (pp. 247-263), Lanham, ML: Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Quinn, L. (2019). Re-imagining the curriculum: spaces for disruption. Stellenbosch, South Africa: African Sun Media.