Title

Access to Physical Rehabilitation for a Range of Adverse Physical Effects Following Different Types of Breast Cancer Surgery

Publication Name

Rehabilitation Oncology

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the access to physical rehabilitation for a range of adverse physical effects following different types of breast cancer surgery. Methods: Online survey of 632 Australian women (mean age = 59.8 years, SD = 9.6) grouped according to their breast cancer surgery, (i) breast-conserving surgery (BCS; n = 228), (ii) mastectomy (MAST; n = 208), (iii) breast reconstruction (BRS; n = 196), who retrospectively reported whether they received any physical rehabilitation for 6 adverse physical effects. Fisher's exact tests were used to compare the frequency of respondents who received physical rehabilitation for each adverse physical effect among the 3 groups. The percentage of the entire cohort of respondents (n = 632) who had lymph nodes removed, postoperative complications, or preexisting musculoskeletal issues who received physical rehabilitation was also tabulated. Results: No significant difference was found among the 3 groups in the percentage of respondents who received physical rehabilitation for most adverse physical effects (scar: P =.27; shoulder: P =.11; torso: P =.76; physical discomfort disturbing sleep: P =.74), except lymphedema (P =.001) and breast support issues (P =.01), which were significantly less for the BRS and BCS groups. Less than 50% of respondents following all types of breast cancer surgery received physical rehabilitation for issues associated with scars, the torso, and physical discomfort disturbing sleep, whereas more than 70% received physical rehabilitation for shoulder issues and lymphedema. Conclusion: Access to physical rehabilitation was similar following the different types of breast cancer surgery; however, gaps were identified for adverse physical effects associated with scars, torso, and physical discomfort disturbing sleep, where access was less than that for shoulder issues and lymphedema.

Open Access Status

This publication may be available as open access

Volume

40

Issue

3

First Page

116

Last Page

124

COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.REO.0000000000000297