Title

Understanding relationships between general self-efficacy and the healthy ageing of older people: An integrative review

Publication Name

Journal of Clinical Nursing

Abstract

Aims and objectives: The aim of this integrative review was to investigate current literature exploring relationships between general self-efficacy and the healthy ageing of older people. Background: Enhancing the health and well-being of older adults, while mitigating consequences of illness and frailty are important priorities in healthy ageing. General self-efficacy is closely associated with human behaviour and has been linked with improved health and well-being. Design: An integrative review using the five-stage method described by Whittemore and Knafl (Journal of Advanced Nursing, 2005, 52, 546). Methods: Academic databases CINAHL, MEDLINE and APA PsycInfo were searched between 2010 and 2020 for original, peer-reviewed papers, published in English that investigated general self-efficacy and factors associated with the healthy ageing of older people. Included papers were critically appraised using the Appraisal tool for Cross-Sectional Studies (AXIS tool) and Critical Appraisal Skills Programme, and underwent data abstraction and synthesis via a constant comparative method. This review was also evaluated using the PRISMA checklist. Results: Twenty-one papers were included in this review. Two main themes emerged. The first highlights positive relationships between general self-efficacy and health and ageing perceptions, with subsequent influence on health behaviours. The second includes two sub-themes, which explores general self-efficacy’s role in maintaining well-being through its effects on psychological health and overcoming physical decline through adaption to changing physical and health conditions. Conclusions: Promoting general self-efficacy has potential benefits for the healthy ageing of older people through positive effects on ageing and health perceptions, health behaviours, psychological health and overcoming physical decline. Relevance to clinical practice: Understanding how general self-efficacy facilitates healthy ageing can guide nursing practices that reduce or mitigate consequences of illness and physical decline on the health and well-being of older people. Strategies aimed at increasing older people’s general self-efficacy can help to facilitate subsequent positive effects on factors that promote healthy ageing.

Open Access Status

This publication is not available as open access

Share

COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocn.16104