Authors

Paul W. Barnes, Loyola University New OrleansFollow
Craig E. Williamson, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, Miami UniversityFollow
Robyn M. Lucas, Australian National University (ANU), United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, University of Western AustraliaFollow
Sharon A. Robinson, University of WollongongFollow
Sasha Madronich, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, National Center For Atmospheric Research, Boulder, United StatesFollow
Nigel D. Paul, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, Lancaster UniversityFollow
Janet F. Bornman, University of Waikato, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, Murdoch University, Curtin UniversityFollow
Alkiviadis F. Bais, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, Aristotle University of ThessalonikiFollow
Barbara Sulzberger, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and TechnologyFollow
Stephen R. Wilson, University of WollongongFollow
Anthony L. Andrady, North Carolina State University, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment PanelFollow
Richard L. McKenzie, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric ResearchFollow
Patrick Neale, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Amy T. Austin, University of Buenos Aires, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, IFEVA Universidad de Buenos AiresFollow
Germar H. Bernhard, Biospherical Instruments IncFollow
Keith R. Solomon, University of Guelph, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment PanelFollow
Rachel E. Neale, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research InstituteFollow
Paul J. Young, Lancaster University
Mary Norval, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, University of EdinburghFollow
Lesley E. Rhodes, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel
Samuel Hylander, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, University of Linnaeus
Kevin C. Rose, University of Wisconsin, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Janice Longstreth, TIGRR, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment PanelFollow
Pieter J. Aucamp, Ptersa Environmental Consultants, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment PanelFollow
Carlos L. Ballare, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, IFEVA Universidad de Buenos AiresFollow
Rose M. Cory, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, University of Michigan
Stephan D. Flint, University of Idaho
Frank R. de Gruijl, Leiden University Medical Center, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment PanelFollow
Donat -P Hader, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
Anu Heikkila, Finnish Meteorological Institute, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel
Marcel A.K Jansen, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, University College Cork
Krishna K. Pandey, Institute of Wood Science and TechnologyFollow
T Matthew Robson, University of Helsinki
Craig A. Sinclair, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel
Sten-Ake Wangberg, University of Gothenburg
Robert Worrest, Columbia University, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment PanelFollow
Seyhan Yazar, University of Western Australia
Antony R. Young, King's College LondonFollow
Richard G. Zepp, United Nations Environment Programme, Environmental Effects Assessment Panel, United States Environmental Protection AgencyFollow

RIS ID

136572

Publication Details

Barnes, P. W., Williamson, C. E., Lucas, R. M., Robinson, S. A., Madronich, S., Paul, N. D., Bornman, J. F., Bais, A. F., Sulzberger, B., Wilson, S. R., Andrady, A. L., McKenzie, R. L., Neale, P. J., Austin, A. T., Bernhard, G. H., Solomon, K. R., Neale, R. E., Young, P. J., Norval, M., Rhodes, L. E., Hylander, S., Rose, K. C., Longstreth, J., Aucamp, P. J., Ballare, C. L., Cory, R. M., Flint, S. D., de Gruijl, F. R., Hader, D. -P., Heikkila, A. M., Jansen, M. A.K., Pandey, K. K., Robson, T. Matthew., Sinclair, C. A., Wangberg, S., Worrest, R. C., Yazar, S., Young, A. R. & Zepp, R. G. (2019). Ozone depletion, ultraviolet radiation, climate change and prospects for a sustainable future. Nature Sustainability, Online First 1-11.

Abstract

Changes in stratospheric ozone and climate over the past 40-plus years have altered the solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation conditions at the Earth's surface. Ozone depletion has also contributed to climate change across the Southern Hemisphere. These changes are interacting in complex ways to affect human health, food and water security, and ecosystem services. Many adverse effects of high UV exposure have been avoided thanks to the Montreal Protocol with its Amendments and Adjustments, which have effectively controlled the production and use of ozone-depleting substances. This international treaty has also played an important role in mitigating climate change. Climate change is modifying UV exposure and affecting how people and ecosystems respond to UV; these effects will become more pronounced in the future. The interactions between stratospheric ozone, climate and UV radiation will therefore shift over time; however, the Montreal Protocol will continue to have far-reaching benefits for human well-being and environmental sustainability.

Grant Number

ARC/DP180100113

Available for download on Tuesday, December 24, 2019

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