Event Title

Attitudes towards languages in education with particular reference to Mauritian Kreol

Start Date

13-9-2018 2:00 PM

End Date

13-9-2018 2:30 PM

Description

Abstract: This paper investigates patterns of language use and language attitudes of young Mauritians in education with special emphasis on Kreol, taught since 2012 in primary education. The first section will give a brief overview of the current language situation. The second will present fieldwork methodology used to collect data in schools in June-September 2018. Preliminary results so far reveal that English is perceived as the most important language for Mauritians in education followed by French. Although Kreol and Asian ancestral languages lag behind in the diglossic patterns of language use, they are nevertheless cultural identity markers for young Mauritians. Despite a steady decline in the use of Asian ancestral languages in the home, results highlight a strong cultural and religious attachment to these languages. The conclusion will discuss implications for Kreol in education and its role as a marker of national identity in Mauritius.

Comments

Bio: Dr Anu Bissoonauth is Senior Lecturer in French in the Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts at the University of Wollongong. Her research interests include social, cultural and political issues in multilingual and multicultural creolophone societies, where French comes in contact with local and/or migrant heritage languages as well as global English.

Publication Date

2018

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Sep 13th, 2:00 PM Sep 13th, 2:30 PM

Attitudes towards languages in education with particular reference to Mauritian Kreol

Abstract: This paper investigates patterns of language use and language attitudes of young Mauritians in education with special emphasis on Kreol, taught since 2012 in primary education. The first section will give a brief overview of the current language situation. The second will present fieldwork methodology used to collect data in schools in June-September 2018. Preliminary results so far reveal that English is perceived as the most important language for Mauritians in education followed by French. Although Kreol and Asian ancestral languages lag behind in the diglossic patterns of language use, they are nevertheless cultural identity markers for young Mauritians. Despite a steady decline in the use of Asian ancestral languages in the home, results highlight a strong cultural and religious attachment to these languages. The conclusion will discuss implications for Kreol in education and its role as a marker of national identity in Mauritius.