Title

Investigating the detection of intention signal during different exercise protocols in robot-assisted hand movement of stroke patients and healthy subjects using EEG-BCI system

RIS ID

138749

Publication Details

M. Butt, G. Naghdy, F. Naghdy, G. Murray & H. Du, "Investigating the detection of intention signal during different exercise protocols in robot-assisted hand movement of stroke patients and healthy subjects using EEG-BCI system," Advances in Science, Technology and Engineering Systems, vol. 4, (4) pp. 300-307, 2019.

Abstract

Improving the hand motor skills in post-stroke patients through rehabilitation based on movement intention derived signals from the brain in conjunction with robot-assistive technologies are explored. The experimental work is conducted using Electroencephalogram based Brain-Computer Interface (EEG-BCI) system and the AMADEO hand rehabilitation robotic device. Two protocols using visual-cues and then using a 2-Dimensional (2D) interactive game is presented on a computer screen to healthy subjects as well as post-stroke patients performing the hand movements. The movement intention signals during hand movement are detected through the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. The intent signals produced at six distinct electrodes are investigated to determine electrodes contributing most to the SVM classifier's performance. Overall, the game protocol shows better classification results for both healthy and stroke patients compared to the visual-cues protocol. FC3 is found to be the most consistent electrode site for the detection of the motor intention of the hand for both protocols. In the experimental work, average classification accuracy for the visual-cues protocol of 67.56% for healthy subjects and 56.24% for stroke patients were obtained. For the game protocol, the classifier accuracy produced for healthy participants was 79.7% and for the post-stroke patients was 66.64%. The results confirm that the intention signal is more pronounced during more engaging activities, such as playing games, for both healthy and stroke subjects. Therefore, the effectiveness of rehabilitation therapy for post-stroke patients could be significantly enhanced using interactive and engaging exercise protocols.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.25046/aj040438