Title

Economic and clinical outcomes of the nurse practitioner-led Sydney Adventist Hospital Community Palliative Care Service

RIS ID

145953

Publication Details

Moreton, S., Saurman, E., Salkeld, G., Edwards, J., Hooper, D., Kneen, K., Rothwell, G. & Watson, J. (2020). Economic and clinical outcomes of the nurse practitioner-led Sydney Adventist Hospital Community Palliative Care Service. Australian Health Review,

Abstract

2020 AHHA. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, economic and personal impacts of the nurse practitioner-led Sydney Adventist Hospital Community Palliative Care Service (SanCPCS) Methods: Parallel economic analysis of usual care was conducted prospectively with patients from the enhanced SanCPCS. A convenient retrospective sample from the initial service was used to determine the impact of the enhanced service on patient care. A time series survey was used with patients and carers from within the expanded service group in order to measure patient outcomes and values as they approached death. Results: Patients of the SanCPCS were less likely to die in hospital and had fewer hospital admissions. In addition, the service halved the estimated hospitalisation cost per patient, but the length of hospital stay was not affected by the service. The SanCPCS was more beneficial for women in terms of fewer hospital admissions and lower costs. Patients' choices regarding place of care and death and what was 'important' to them changed over time. For instance, patients tended to prefer being at home as they approached death, and being pain free doubled in importance. Conclusions: Nurse practitioner-led community palliative care services have the potential to result in significant economic and personal benefits for patients and their families in need of such care. What is known about the topic?: National trends show an emphasis on community services with the aim of promoting and supporting the choice of dying at home, and this coincides with drives to reduce hospital costs and length of stay. Community-based palliative care services may offer substantial economic and clinical benefits. What does this paper add?: The SanCPCS was the first nurse practitioner-led community-based palliative care service in Australia. The expansion of this service led to significantly fewer admissions and deaths in hospital, and halved the estimated hospitalisation cost per patient. What are implications for practitioners?: Nurse practitioner-led models for care in the out-patient or community setting are a logical direction for palliative services through the engagement of specialised providers uniquely trained to support, nurture, guide and educate patients and their carers.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH19247