Title

Relationship between adherence to WHO “24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years” and motor skills or cognitive function in preschool children: SUNRISE pilot study

RIS ID

145512

Publication Details

Tanaka, C., Okada, S., Takakura, M., Hasimoto, K., Mezawa, H., Ando, D., Tanaka, S. & Okely, A. (2020). Relationship between adherence to WHO “24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years” and motor skills or cognitive function in preschool children: SUNRISE pilot study. Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine, 69 (4), 327-333.

Abstract

© 2020 Japanese Society of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine. All rights reserved. This study examined the relationship between meeting the World Health Organization's (WHO) 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for the Early Years and motor skills and cognitive function in preschool children. Participants were 4-year-old boys and girls in urban and rural areas (n=69). Physical activity was measured using a triaxial accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X). Screen time and sleep duration were assessed via self-report by guardians. Meeting the 24-h movement guidelines was defined as: 10 to 13 h/night and nap of sleep, ≤1 h/day of sedentary screen time, and at least 180 min/day more than 1.5 METs. Motor skills were evaluated by the Ages & Stages Questionnaires, Third Edition (ASQ-3). Executive functions (shifting, visual-spatial working memory and inhibition) were evaluated by the Early Years Toolbox (Japanese translation). The prevalence of children meeting all three recommendations was 7.2% and 7.2% met none of the three recommendations. Children meeting physical activity recommendation had a better inhibition score compared to children meeting none of the recommendation (p=0.005). While, children not meeting the sleep recommendation had a better inhibition score compared to children meeting of the recommendation (p=0.042). In conclusion, meeting the physical activity or sleep recommendations were positively or negatively associated with the inhibition score. On the other hand, meeting none of the sedentary behaviour and the 3 recommendations was not associated with motor skills or cognitive function.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.7600/JSPFSM.69.327