Year

2016

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

School of Education

Abstract

This study examined the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) of people with physical disabilities in Saudi Arabia. Improving the VR services in Saudi Arabia is essential in order to help people with physical disabilities become active members in the society, and thus, a better and active life. The aim of this research was to increase knowledge of VR phenomena in Saudi Arabia and make recommendations for improving VR services. Two hundred and twenty-four participants Spinal Cord Injuries (SCI) who completed questionnaires were undertaking or had just finished their VR programs in VR centres or hospitals in Saudi Arabia. A further 32 participants were Trainers. Nine (patients/clients/students) were interviewed by telephone. Factor analysis, multiple regression analysis, and thematic analysis were used to test hypotheses relating VR trainer self-efficacy to proxy efficacy for the trainer, VR self-efficacy, and VR training performance, and proxy efficacy for the trainer and VR self-efficacy to VR training performance of people with physical disabilities. Students and VR trainers completed a questionnaire developed by the researcher, some provided free responses in the questionnaire, and some were interviewed by phone. Quantitative analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 19.0, for Mac. This study employed a conceptual framework based on SCT. The study provided evidence that VR selfefficacy predicted VR training performance. The findings of this study also provide some evidence that VR trainer self-efficacy was related positively to VR self-efficacy of the participants with SCI. VR self-efficacy and proxy efficacy for VR trainer were related to the VR training performance. It was also found that other variables such as Time Since Injury (TSI) predicted VR self-efficacy and proxy efficacy for the trainer. The findings of this study have significant implications for the future of VR of people with physical disabilities in Saudi Arabia. Enhancing VR self-efficacy of people with physical disabilities could enhance their VR training performance. Moreover, improving VR trainer self-efficacy could, in turn, improve VR self-efficacy of people with physical disabilities, and therefore, enhance their VR training performance.

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