Year

2015

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy

Department

School of Chemistry

Abstract

All forms of life are defined by their DNAs. For organisms to survive, their chromosomes have to be replicated authentically and passed onto their next generations. This process is very complex – it involves a large number of proteins working in a very dynamic way. By elucidating this system, it helps us understand the basic mechanisms underlying life, to the eventual benefit of human beings.

This Thesis contributes to the understanding of E. coli DNA replication by revealing and defining numerous protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions biochemically and structurally. Importantly, it also provides insights into new protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions.

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