Title

A comparison of blindpulling and blindwalking as measures of perceived absolute distance

RIS ID

88635

Publication Details

Philbeck, J. W., Woods, A. J., Kontra, C. & Zdenkova, P. (2010). A comparison of blindpulling and blindwalking as measures of perceived absolute distance. Behavior Research Methods, 42 (1), 148-160.

Abstract

Blindwalking has become a common measure of perceived absolute distance and location, but it requires a relatively large testing space and cannot be used with people for whom walking is difficult or impossible. In the present article, we describe an alternative response type that is closely matched to blindwalking in several important respects but is less resource intensive. In the blindpulling technique, participants view a target, then close their eyes and pull a length of tape or rope between the hands to indicate the remembered target distance. As with blindwalking, this response requires integration of cyclical, bilateral limb movements over time. Blind-pulling and blindwalking responses are tightly linked across a range of viewing conditions, and blind-pulling is accurate when prior exposure to visually guided pulling is provided. Thus, blindpulling shows promise as a measure of perceived distance that may be used in nonambulatory populations and when the space available for testing is limited.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/BRM.42.1.148