Title

Is Higher Acceptance Associated With Less Anticipatory Grief Among Patients in Palliative Care?

RIS ID

114740

Publication Details

Davis, E., Deane, F., Lyons, G. & Barclay, G. (2017). Is Higher Acceptance Associated With Less Anticipatory Grief Among Patients in Palliative Care?. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 54 (1), 120-125.

Abstract

Patients in palliative care can experience substantial psychological suffering. Acceptance-based interventions from approaches such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy have demonstrated effectiveness in helping people cope with a range of life challenges. However, there is a dearth of research examining mechanisms of therapeutic change for patients in palliative care. Objectives: To assess the relationships between acceptance, anticipatory grief, anxiety, and depression among patients in palliative care. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was verbally administered to inpatients (N = 73) receiving palliative care. Results: Correlations revealed that acceptance had a strong relationship with anticipatory grief, anxiety, and depression. A hierarchical regression analysis on anticipatory grief showed that acceptance was the largest predictor and accounted for an additional 13% of variance in anticipatory grief over and above anxiety and depression. Conclusion: The present study provides preliminary data suggesting that interventions that target acceptance may be indicated in patients in palliative care.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2017.03.012