Title

"Whatever it takes": nursing students' experiences of administering medication in the clinical setting

RIS ID

75194

Publication Details

Reid-Searl, K., Moxham, L., Walker, S. & Happell, B. (2010). "Whatever it takes": nursing students' experiences of administering medication in the clinical setting. Qualitative Health Research, 20 (7), 952-965.

Abstract

This research was conducted to examine experiences of nursing students in administering medication in the clinical setting. Grounded theory was utilized, involving in-depth interviews with 28 final-year students. In this article, we examine the importance participants attached to conforming to the prevailing culture, and their responses when offered what they considered inadequate supervision. Three main categories emerged: norming for the survival of self, conforming and adapting for benefit of self and others; and performing with absolute conscience. Subsequently, the model of contingent reasoning was developed to explain the actions of students. Contingent reasoning was influenced by the relationship with the registered nurse and individual characteristics of the students. Contingent reasoning was validated by participants and is discussed in relation to Kohlberg's theory of moral reasoning and other relevant nursing literature. This model has the potential to enhance understanding of how students make decisions, and ultimately to positively influence this process.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049732310364988