Title

Impact of feedwater salinity on energy requirements of a small-scale membrane filtration system

RIS ID

84256

Publication Details

Richards, B. S., Masson, L. & Schäfer, A. I. (2009). Impact of feedwater salinity on energy requirements of a small-scale membrane filtration system. In E. K. Yanful (Eds.), Appropriate Technologies for Environmental Protection in the Developing World: Selected Papers from ERTEP 2007, July 17-19 2007, Ghana, Africa (pp. 123-137). Netherlands: Springer.

Additional Publication Information

ISBN: 9781402091384

Abstract

Many remote communities in both developed and developing countries lack electricity and clean drinking water. One solution, for such communities that rely on brackish groundwater, is a photovoltaic (PV) powered hybrid ultrafiltration (UF)/nanofiltration (NF) or reverse osmosis (RO) membrane filtration system. The system prototype described here can produce between 150-280 L of clean water for each peak sunshine hour, depending on the salinity of the feedwater (1-5 g/L of total dissolved solids (TDS)) and membrane choice. The best specific energy consumption (SEC) for achieving drinking water quality with a salinity of less than 0.5 g/L TDS from 1, 2.5 and 5 g/L salinity feedwater was 1.1, 1.8 and 2.6 kWh/m3, respectively. Slightly higher feedwaters (7.5 g/L) can be treated with one of the membranes tested, and as long as sufficient power is available for providing an adequate transmembrane pressure. Higher salinities cannot be treated effectively with the current system due to pressure limitations. Energy recovery would need to be investigated in order to achieve a competitive SEC for such high salinity feedwaters.

Please refer to publisher version or contact your library.

Share

COinS
 

Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9139-1_14