Title

Face in Taiwanese business interactions: from emic concepts to emic practices

RIS ID

102783

Publication Details

Chang, W.M. & Haugh, M. (2013). Face in Taiwanese business interactions: from emic concepts to emic practices. In D. Z. Kádár & Y. Pan (Eds.), Chinese Discourse and Interaction: Theory and Practice (pp. 126-150). London: Equinox.

Additional Publication Information

ISBN: 9781845536329

Abstract

‘Face’ in the figurative sense of a positive social image, honour, prestige or good reputation is often closely associated with feelings of pride and satisfaction or, alternatively, embarrassment and humiliation. It is perhaps for this reason that it has been extensively studied and theorised over the past few decades, being increasingly applied to the analysis of communication and social interaction in a variety of disciplines. Yet while face has become firmly established as a means of explaining various social phenomena including politeness, impoliteness and offence, impression management, conflict management and the like (e.g. Arundale 2006; Bousfield 2008; Brown and Levinson 1987; Goffman 1967; Ting-Toomey 1988, 2005), it has also been long associated with East Asians, particularly the Chinese.

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