Title

Exposing the “wellbeing gap” between American men and women: revelations from the sociology of emotion surveys

RIS ID

96120

Publication Details

Patulny, R. (2014). Exposing the “wellbeing gap” between American men and women: revelations from the Sociology of Emotion Surveys. Emotion Review, 7 (2), 169-174.

Abstract

Population surveys of emotion offer great potential to understand subjective wellbeing, though most do not reveal how emotions other than happiness and satisfaction impact on daily lives. This article presents a case study analysis of data from Kahneman and Krueger’s (2006) Princeton Time and Affect Survey to demonstrate that the choice of emotions or affects measured in surveys does matter in determining wellbeing in contexts such as those in which gender plays an important role. It finds that that tiredness and interest (excluded from Kahneman and Krueger’s wellbeing construct) comprise a large part of American women’s but not men’s unpleasant education, unpaid housework, and childcare. The article concludes by suggesting that the most appropriate method for establishing a “minimum” set of emotions is to conduct survey-based “audits” of emotions experienced in daily activities.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1754073914554785