Title

Changes in the expression of prejudice in public discourse in Australia: assessing the impact of hate speech laws on letters to the editor 1992-2010

RIS ID

94936

Publication Details

Gelber, K. and McNamara, L. (2014). Changes in the expression of prejudice in public discourse in Australia: assessing the impact of hate speech laws on letters to the editor 1992-2010. Australian Journal of Human Rights, 20 (1), 99-128.

Abstract

This article seeks to fill a gap in the literature on empirical research into the experiences of countries with hate speech laws. We report on the results of a qualitative document analysis of letters to the editor published between 1992 and 2010 in Australia, a country with 25 years of experience of civil hate speech laws. The analysis demonstrates the tension between publishing views of members of the public and remaining within the confines of legally permissible expression. Positive findings include an awareness of the existence of hate speech laws; a noticeable shift in language use, as evidenced by the elimination or reduction (depending on the minority being targeted) of crudely prejudicial expressions; and an overall reduction in the proportion of prejudicial letters published. Contrarily, prejudice is still being expressed to a significant degree, at times quite virulently.

Link to publisher version (URL)

Australian Journal of Human Rights

Grant Number

ARC/DP1096721

Please refer to publisher version or contact your library.

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