Title

Experimental investigation of the 100 keV x-ray dose response of the high-temperature thermoluminescence in Lif: Mg, Ti (TLD-100): theoretical interpretation using the unified interaction model

RIS ID

36175

Publication Details

Livingstone, J., Horowitz, Y. S., Oster, L., Datz, H., Lerch, M., Rozenfeld, A. and Horowitz, A. (2010). Experimental investigation of the 100 keV x-ray dose response of the high-temperature thermoluminescence in Lif: Mg, Ti (TLD-100): theoretical interpretation using the unified interaction model. Radiation Protection Dosimetry, 138 (4), 320-333.

Abstract

The dose response of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) chips was measured from 1 to 50 000 Gy using 100 keV X rays at the European Synchroton Radiation Facility. Glow curves were deconvoluted into component glow peaks using a computerised glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) code based on first-order kinetics. The normalised dose response, f(D), of glow peaks 4 and 5 and 5b (the major components of composite peak 5), as well as peaks 7 and 8 (two of the major components of the high-temperature thermoluminescence (HTTL) at high levels of dose) was separately determined and theoretically interpreted using the unified interaction model (UNIM). The UNIM is a nine-parameter model encompassing both the irradiation/absorption stage and the thermally induced relaxation/recombination stage with an admixture of both localised and delocalised recombination mechanisms. The effects of radiation damage are included in the present modelling via the exponential removal of luminescent centres (LCs) at high dose levels. The main features of the experimentally measured dose response are: (i) increase in f(D)max with glow peak temperature, (ii) increase in Dmax (the dose level at which f(D)max occurs) with increasing glow peak temperature, and (iii) decreased effects of radiation damage with increasing glow peak temperature. The UNIM interpretation of this behaviour requires both strongly decreasing values of ks (the relative contribution of localised recombination) as a function of glow peak temperature and, as well, significantly different values of the dose-filling constants of the trapping centre (TC) and LC for peaks 7 and 8 than those used for peaks 4 and 5. This suggests that different TC/LC configurations are responsible for HTTL. The relative intensity of peak 5a (a low-temperature satellite of peak 5 arising from localised recombination) was found to significantly increase at higher dose levels due to preferential electron and hole population of the trapping/recombination complex giving rise to composite glow peak 5. It is also demonstrated that possible changes in the trapping cross section of the LC and the competitive centres due to increasing sample/glow peak temperature do not significantly influence these observations/conclusions.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rpd/ncp272