Title

Coronary angiography with synchrotron X-ray source on pigs after iodine or gadolinium intravenous injection

RIS ID

76664

Publication Details

Esteve, F., Elleaume, H., Bertrand, B., Charvet, A., Fiedler, S., Le Duc, G., corde, s., Nemoz, C., Renier, M., Lefaix, J., Leplat, J., Suortti, P., Thomlinson, W. & Le Bas, J. F. (2002). Coronary angiography with synchrotron X-ray source on pigs after iodine or gadolinium intravenous injection. Academic Radiology, 9 (s1), S92-S97.

Abstract

Arterial angiography, an invasive method for the diagnosis of vascular alterations, is a standard procedure established many years ago. The technique provides excellent images of the coronary arteries and their anatomic configuration but is not suitable for general screening or repetitive controls in clinical research due to the use of intra-arterial catheters. As alternatives, noninvasive methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound (US) have been continuously improving during the recent years, but they still provide less relevant images (1- 4). Another approach, usually known as K-edge digital subtraction angiography, uses monochromatic x-rays from synchrotron sources (5). After intravenous (IV) injection of the contrast agent, two images are produced with monochromatic beams, above and below the contrast agent K-edge (iodine or gadolinium). The logarithmic subtraction of the two measurements results in an iodine- or gadolinium- enhanced image, which can be precisely quantified. The aim is to provide a less invasive technique than the conventional imaging procedure to follow patients after coronary interventions. First in vivo studies have been performed on pigs at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) to test the

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