Title

On malfunctioning software

RIS ID

99674

Publication Details

Floridi, L., Fresco, N. & Primiero, G. (2015). On malfunctioning software. Synthese: an international journal for epistemology, methodology and philosophy of science, 192 (4), 1199-1220.

Abstract

Artefacts do not always do what they are supposed to, due to a variety of reasons, including manufacturing problems, poor maintenance, and normal wear-andtear. Since software is an artefact, it should be subject to malfunctioning in the same sense in which other artefacts can malfunction. Yet, whether software is on a par with other artefacts when it comes to malfunctioning crucially depends on the abstraction used in the analysis. We distinguish between "negative" and "positive" notions of malfunction. A negative malfunction, or dysfunction, occurs when an artefact token either does not (sometimes) or cannot (ever) do what it is supposed to. A positive malfunction, or misfunction, occurs when an artefact token may do what is supposed to but, at least occasionally, it also yields some unintended and undesirable effects. We argue that software, understood as type, may misfunction in some limited sense, but cannot dysfunction. Accordingly, one should distinguish software from other technical artefacts, in view of their design that makes dysfunction impossible for the former, while possible for the latter.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11229-014-0610-3