Title

Towards the blanket coverage DNA profiling and sampling of citizens in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland

RIS ID

97635

Publication Details

Michael, K. (2014). Towards the blanket coverage DNA profiling and sampling of citizens in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. In M. G. Michael & K. Michael (Eds.), Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants (pp. 187-207). United States: IGI Global.

Abstract

The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) ruling of Sand Marper v United Kingdom will have major implications on the retention of Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) samples, profiles, and fingerprints of innocents stored in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. In its attempt to develop a comprehensive National DNA Database (NDNAD) for the fight against crime, the UK Government has come under fire for its blanket-style coverage of the DNA sampling of its populace. Figures indicate that the UK Government retains a highly disproportionate number of samples when compared to other nation states in the Council of Europe (Co E), and indeed anywhere else in the world. In addition, the UK Government also retains a disproportionate number of DNA profiles and samples of specific ethnic minority groups such as the Black Ethnic Minority group (BEM). Finally, the Sand Marper case demonstrates that innocent children, and in general innocent citizens, are still on the national DNA database, sometimes even without their knowledge. Despite the fact that the Sand Marper case concluded with the removal of the biometric data of MrS and Mr Marper, all other innocent subjects must still apply to their local Metropolitan Police Service to have their fingerprints or DNA removed from the register. This is not only a time-consuming process, but not feasible.

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Link to publisher version (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0.ch008