Title

Family violence, help-seeking and the close-knit Aboriginal community: Lessons for mainstream service provision

RIS ID

57141

Publication Details

Lumby, B. L. Farrelly, T. 2009, 'Family violence, help-seeking and the close-knit Aboriginal community: Lessons for mainstream service provision', Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearinghouse, vol. 19, pp. 1-24.

Abstract

For me, the key issues are you’ve got to be culturally appropriate, and you’ve got to be in tune with community and families’ behaviour patterns. You’ve got to know the social stuff that goes on within communities, you’ve got to be aware or know the community ties as in community relationships… what you’re related to and all that goes on with it. But also make yourself available to attend community or the area where you are working in - specific Aboriginal events. Like balls, community BBQs, community meetings etc, etc - focus group participant

Help-seeking has been defined as ‘…any communication about a problem or troublesome event which is directed toward obtaining support, advice, or assistance in times of distress’ (Gourash 1978, p.414). The presupposition of any family violence intervention and prevention initiative is that help-seeking by or on behalf of a victim of family violence should result in increased safety and an escape from the effects of such violence. There is also the presupposition that help-seeking by or on behalf of a perpetrator of family violence should result in assistance and support to change his behaviour.

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